Antidotes and their Mechanism of Action: A Systematic Review

Deva Tulasi Komatineni

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Udaya Ratna Kolli

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Mohammed Bashir Abazar Elmamoon Ball Elsheep

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Varshitha Reddy Balineni

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Keerthi Sri Gundla

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Yousif Osman Salih Saeed

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Jithendra Chimakurthy

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Ravindra Babu Pingili *

Faculty of Pharmacy, Vignan’s Foundation for Science, Technology and Research (Deemed to be University), Vadlamudi, Guntur-522213, Andhra Pradesh, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

An antidote is a therapeutic agent that counteracts the hazardous effects of a medicine or toxin, according to the International Programmed of Chemical Safety. Antidotes have been defined as agents that alter the poisonous substance's kinetics or interfere with its impact at receptor sites. This could be due to the poison being prevented from being absorbed, bound, and neutralized immediately, antagonizing its end-organ impact, or inhibiting conversion to more hazardous metabolites. The kind of toxin eaten, the anticipated amount taken by the individual, the route of exposure, clinical toxicity characteristics, half-life, and pharmacokinetics, as well as the risk versus benefit of administering the antidote, all influence the length of antidotal therapy. An infusion may be necessary if the antidote has a short half-life, especially if poisoning symptoms return. To treat the negative effects of toxins, it is required. Occasionally, that intervention is necessary. may entail the use of pharmacological antagonists, also referred to as an antidote The most common poisons, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, include Acetylcysteine, naloxone, atropine, and deferoxamine are some of the most widely used antidotes.

Keywords: Antidote, poison, pesticides, insecticides, acetylcysteine


How to Cite

Komatineni, D. T., Kolli, U. R., Elsheep, M. B. A. E. B., Balineni, V. R., Gundla, K. S., Saeed, Y. O. S., Chimakurthy, J. and Pingili, R. B. (2022) “Antidotes and their Mechanism of Action: A Systematic Review”, Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International, 34(38B), pp. 67–87. doi: 10.9734/jpri/2022/v34i38B36228.

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