Phytochemical and Pharmacological Screening for Antidiabetic Activity of Salvia aegyptiaca L. Ethanolic Leaves Extract

Main Article Content

Fazil Ahmad
Abeer Mohammed Al- Subaie
Rasheed Ahemad Shaik
J. Muthu Mohamed
Abdul Saleem Mohammad

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder of carbohydrate, fat, and protein, which results in high levels of glucose in the body after a meal or fasting. This disease is caused by the absence or reduction of insulin secretion. Accordingly, diabetes is usually classified into two types, Type 1(IDDM) and Type II (NIDDM). The aim of the present study is to carry the phytochemical analysis and antidiabetic activity of Salvia aegyptiaca L ethanolic leaves extract. Phytochemical study was carried out by standard methods, shows the presence of various phytochemical constituents such as, phenols, flavonoids, steroids, proteins, glycosides, carbohydrates, lipids, alkaloids, tannins and terpenoids, while saponins shown to be absent. Antidiabetic activity of Salvia aegyptiaca L were carried out in both normoglycemic and diabetic induced rats. Normoglycemic animal group were fed with ethanolic leaves extract of Salvia aegyptiaca L at a dose of 250mg/kg and 500mg/kg alone for 14days, showed decrease in blood glucose level. In diabetic animal group the rats were made diabetic by intraperitoneal(i.p) injection of 100 mg/kg alloxan monohydrate, then followed by administration of ethanolic leaves extract of Salvia aegyptiaca (250mg/kg and 500mg/kg) and standard Tolbutamide (50mg/kg,p.o) for14 days. The results of the diabetic induced group also showed decrease in glucose levels. The results of the current investigation demonstrate that various phytochemical present in Salvia aegyptiaca L ethanolic leaves extracts, might be responsible for antidiabetic effect, due to its known antioxidant property.

Keywords:
Salvia aegyptiaca L, ethanol, insulin, antioxidant, tolbutamide, diabetes mellitus.

Article Details

How to Cite
Ahmad, F., Subaie, A. M. A.-, Shaik, R. A., Mohamed, J. M., & Mohammad, A. S. (2020). Phytochemical and Pharmacological Screening for Antidiabetic Activity of Salvia aegyptiaca L. Ethanolic Leaves Extract. Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International, 32(12), 122-131. https://doi.org/10.9734/jpri/2020/v32i1230569
Section
Original Research Article

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